Friday, 5 May 2017

#WorldReads - five books from India

If this is your first visit to my WorldReads blog series, the idea of the posts is to encourage and promote the reading of global literature. On the 5th of each month I highlight five books I have read from a particular country and you can see links to previous countries' posts at the end of this post.

This month's country is India! A country with a vast literary tradition in many languages, I believe the earliest works still in existence were written in Sanskrit about 3500 years ago. I have chosen modern novels for this post though with all five having been written in the 21st century!


Inheritance Of Loss by Kiran Desai

Buy from independent booksellers via Alibris
Buy the book from Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk
Buy the paperback from Speedyhen
Buy the paperback from The Book Depository

Read my original book review on Stephanie Jane

According to Goodreads, I first read this in 2009 and a few events in the story did seem familiar as I got to them, but I couldn't remember how it would all end so enjoyed immersing myself in the tale again five years later. Desai has a beautifully rich style of writing which really brings her views of rural Himalayan India and immigrant New York to life.


A House For Happy Mothers by Amulya Malladi

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Buy the ebook from Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk
Buy the paperback from The Book Depository

Read my original book review on Literary Flits

As a non-maternal woman I wasn't sure how I would get on reading a book about babies! I am interested in the moral dilemma of paid surrogacy though and found A House For Happy Mothers to be a fascinating insight with compelling perspectives from both sides.


The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga

Buy the book from Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk
Buy the paperback from Speedyhen
Buy the paperback from The Book Depository
Buy the paperback from Waterstones

Read my original book review on Literary Flits

For what essentially is a murderer's confession, The White Tiger is very funny. There is frequent dry humour covering all aspects of Indian life from well-known stereotype characters to unexpected scenarios and I liked Balram's voice which is convincing and sympathetically portrayed.


The Kolkata Conundrum by Kalyan Lahiri

Buy from independent booksellers via Abebooks
Buy from independent booksellers via Alibris
Buy the ebook from Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk
Buy the paperback from The Book Depository

Read my original book review on Literary Flits

This crime mystery differs from many books in its genre by its dignified and elegant tone. The novel has a strong sense of authenticity, perhaps unsurprisingly as Kolkata is Lahiri's home city, and I loved his presentation of the differing locales, especially as viewed through the eyes of first-time visitor, Orko.


One Indian Girl by Chetan Bhagat

Buy the ebook from Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk
Buy the paperback from Speedyhen
Buy the paperback from The Book Depository
Buy the paperback from Waterstones

Read my original book review on Literary Flits

A light romantic read to finish although, surprisingly for me, this one provoked strong reactions among other Goodreaders who either found it intimidatingly feminist or not feminist enough!


That's it for May's WorldReads from India. I hope I have tempted you to try reading a book from this country! Please do Comment your own favourite Indian books below and if you fancy buying any of the five I have suggested, clicking through the links from this blog to do so would mean I earn a small commission payment.

If you missed any earlier WorldReads posts, we have already 'visited' Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, ItalyNew ZealandNigeria, South AfricaSpain, Sweden and Turkey. In June I will be highlighting five books by Russian authors. See you on the 5th to find out which ones!

2 comments:

  1. Thanks Stephanie, I love the world reads series you do. I always see something interesting here. I just wish I had more time for reading!!

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