Saturday, 30 September 2017

September roundup and October preview

Stephanie Jane 
September has been a pretty exciting month all told! We had our tri-city holiday to Prague, Vienna and Budapest which I loved. I think Prague was probably my favourite of the three although all had memorable moments. The boat trip in Prague! The Spanish Riding School in Vienna! The dancing fountain in Budapest! You can read my Stephanie Jane blog posts about each city by clicking the links below:


My #TreatYourself post was the most popular of the month and I hope you took advantage of the five Special Offer codes I featured? We'll all be needing Cocktail Lip Balms when winter kicks in! I also featured a bakery business discount and was delighted to then be contacted by BakerLou with the offer of a baking kit to try out and review. I will be blogging my Gingerbread Men baking afternoon very soon! In the meantime how about baking this Vegan Slow Cooker Carrot Cake instead? (Hint: you'll need a tin of chickpeas!)


Literary Flits
I blogged my Month In Books reading wrapup yesterday, but didn't know what Literary Flits' most popular posts for the month would be at the time of writing. In September, my Top Three Book Posts were:

Strungballs by Mike Russell
When Darkness Falls by Kathleen Harryman
The Smallest Thing by Lisa Manterfield

If you haven't discovered these books for yourself yet, click through to take a look. All three have Giveaways, but only the When Darkness Falls one is still open (until October 4th).

I realised yesterday that the Goodreads / BookCrossing Decade Challenge doesn't seem to be happening this year. I've particularly enjoyed this challenge over the past two years so am just going to carry it on independently! If you'd like to join me, the idea is to read a book that was first published in each of the decades from 1900 to 2017 - 12 in all. The challenge started on the 1st of September and finished at the end of August so I will keep to those dates. I've already got two books read: Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie for the 2010s and Havana Black by Leonardo Padura for the 1990s.


Artisan Rainbow 
Finally, my new handmade crafts blog, Artisan Rainbow, has done even better than I hoped in its first full month and I love searching out a different item to present each day. I managed to make some affiliate sales too which is especially encouraging. From Red on Mondays to Purple on Saturdays and with a Sunday Rainbow, I have already showcased items from birdboxes to umbrellas! In September my Top Three most popular posts were:

Owl Hot Water Bottle Cover by Moonglow Art
Polygon Window Demijohn Lamp by Humblesticks
Jaya Edge Wooden House by Little Tree Furniture

Artisan Rainbow participated in #JustACardDay too with a punnily clever Gincident card by Doodles Dot Dorset - perfect for all those Gin drinking friends!

I'm now looking forward to my 50th artisan post on Monday and to getting a tad Halloween-inspired throughout October!


In a change to our rest-of-the-year plans, it now looks as though we will heading overseas mid-October rather than waiting until the New Year as we had originally intended. I will be able to blog more about our travels which will be fun - and we'll get to discover how our Bailey caravan coped with being left in Spain all summer!

Roll on October!

Friday, 29 September 2017

A Month in Books - September 2017


It's always interesting to see which of my book posts will be most popular - other than those with Giveaways of course! - and which result in sales. The majority of Literary Flits links are affiliate links so when you click through I get a small commission for any purchases you all make. (Thank you!) September's reports had a surprise in store showing a sale of The Leopard which I'd reviewed way back in June. It's great to see older posts still generating attention! Don't forget you can browse titles of every Literary Flits book on the Author A-Z page or use the LinkWithin feature and label links at the end of each post.

Our fab holiday at the beginning of September cut into my reading time so I only read thirteen books this month! They include bizarre surrealism, poetry, crime mysteries and thrillers, and an excellent ancient-story-retelling. Keep scrolling past the Spotlights for my mini reviews ...


Guest reviews

Literary Flits hosted one Guest Review this month. If you have an indie author, small press or global literature book review that you would like to share please do get in touch.


Grace In Strange Disguise by Christine Dillon

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Read author Trix Wilkins' book review on Literary Flits


Spotlights

Do also get in touch to buy a Spotlight post for your book(s). Further details through This Link. Alternatively you could win a Spotlight by following me and retweeting my pinned tweet on Twitter! August's winner was Kathleen Harryman who promotes her York based thriller When Darkness Falls.


The Dark Mermaid by Christina L Barr + Giveaway

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Read the original post on Literary Flits



Pretty Perfect by Lana Sky + Giveaway

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Journey's End: Death, Dying and the End of Life by Victoria Brewster and Julie Saeger Nierenberg + Giveaway

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Blackout by Lawrence Johnson Sr. + Giveaway

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When Darkness Falls by Kathleen Harryman + Giveaway

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Carry Me Home by Jessica Therrien + Giveaway

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My reviews


Strungballs by Mike Russell + Giveaway

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I won a copy of Strungballs in a Facebook giveaway. I already knew of Mike Russell's work by way of a Rebecca Gransden's Nothing In Strange Guest Review so was delighted to try it myself. This novella is seriously weird! Entertaining definitely, and wonderfully surreal!

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



Everything Is Better With A Cape by C H Clepitt

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Kerry is back and still making event-inappropriate fashion choices! I enjoyed Everything Is Better With A Cape even more than its I Wore Heels To The Apocalypse predecessor and I think it is definitely the most humorous post-apocalyptic fiction I have read! There is little in the way of grim despair in Clepitt's invented world, instead we are faced with superheroic costume choices, gooey robots and a brilliantly sarcastic badger.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



35 Crocheted Bags by Emma Friedlander-Collins

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35 Crocheted Bags is a great resource for practical crochet patterns. It includes clear instructions for all kinds of bags from large totes and satchels to coin purses and glasses cases and I like that many are designed to be made with thick, chunky yarns. I can get from pattern to finished product pretty quickly!

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



The Nomad's Premonition by Georges Benay + Giveaway

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I struggled through this book for a blog tour. I know other readers enjoyed it, but I think I can safely now say that financial thrillers aren't a genre for me.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

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My Book Of The Month! Shamsie's retelling of Sophocles' Antigone is brilliant and I loved reading this book. It's longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and I have my fingers crossed that it wins!

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



Service Disrupted: My Peace Corps Story by Tyler E. Lloyd

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Primarily Lloyd's recounting of his mental turmoil following a health scare while working as a Peace Corps volunteer in Burkina Faso. The memoir is an interesting insight into the reactions of a young man potentially afflicted with a terminal illness, especially the Schrodinger's Cat situation he endures whilst awaiting further tests and a definite prognosis.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



The Hairdresser Of Harare by Tendai Huchu

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I had seen The Hairdresser Of Harare positively reviewed on other book blogs so jumped at the chance to purchase my own copy when the ebook was discounted recently on Amazon. It's a fairly light-hearted story - although with violent episodes towards the end - and I thought Huchu portrayed modern day Zimbabwe in a lively and entertaining way with great characters.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



The Smallest Thing by Lisa Manterfield

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Manterfield understands the teenage small-town claustrophobic experienced by Emmott Syddall in this thriller and I felt a lot of both sympathy and empathy for this character throughout the novel. The situation in which she ultimately finds herself is extreme, but always highly plausible - especially as I already knew the real village of Eyam had suffered plague quarantine before.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



Wayfaring Stranger by James Lee Burke

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I felt this novel never quite decided what it wanted to be. It misses out on being a strong historical work, but didn't quite convince me as a political crime thriller either. Strong characters and some vivid writing made it an enjoyable read, but I thought it should have been excellent instead of just good.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



A Journey Round My Room by Xavier de Maistre

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I learned about A Journey Round My Room by reading Traveling In Place by Bernd Stiegler a couple of years ago. Stiegler was impressed with this autobiographical travel parody and I had looked forward to discovering it too. Unfortunately I was quite disappointed!

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



What's Wrong With The Street by Andy Carrington

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Andy Carrington returns to the fervent anger of his previous poetry collection, Apathy Will Kill Us All, for this newest publication. For me, the poems felt like segments of an epic work rather than individual pieces because of their overlapping subject matter and recurring themes. The sheer energy Carrington maintains throughout the book is exhausting!

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



Sense And Sensibility by Jane Austen

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I'm now two-thirds of the way through my Jane Austen Challenge to read all six of her novels during 2017. I have found that they seem to fall into two categories and sadly Sense And Sensibility joins the Dull as Ditchwater side for me.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits



Havana Black by Leonardo Padura

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I love when charity shop take-a-chance books turn out to be brilliant and that is certainly the case with Havana Black. This Cuban crime novel concentrates more on character relationships and portraying Havana than on the mystery itself and I thought it was much the stronger for this.

Read my original book review on Literary Flits


That's it for this month and I know I have already got some great books lined up to read and review in October including macabrely titled Iranian novel, Through The Sad Woods Our Corpses Will Hang by Ava Farmehri, and an autobiography of Burundi runner Gilbert Tuhabonye. Keep up daily on Literary Flits or I will see you here at the end of the month for another round up.

Don't forget the Giveaways!

Thursday, 28 September 2017

Happy #JustACard Day!!


Creative souls across the UK are supporting Just A Card Day today and I am delighted to be taking part too. The campaign started when Artist and Designer Sarah Hamilton saw the quote "If everyone who'd complimented our beautiful gallery had bought 'just a card' we'd still be open" by store keepers who'd recently closed their gallery. This prompted a call to action!

I believe it is vital to support our artisans and artists and no purchase is too small to be appreciated! Please do peruse the #handmade tags on social media when you're looking for gift ideas or follow my Artisan Rainbow blog for daily inspiration.

I started Artisan Rainbow to promote British crafters and I love discovering all the uniquely gorgeous treasures available, often with no greater price tag than their mass-produced counterparts. Thursday's rainbow colour is Green and I chose a brilliant Gin card to feature today - click through to see it!


Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Budapest sculpture and a dancing fountain

Shoes On The Danube Bank 
One of Budapest's most famous public sculptures is entitled Shoes On The Danube Bank. It was created by Can Togay, a film director, together with sculptor Gyula Pauer as a memorial to 3,500 people - 800 of them Jewish - shot into the Danube by Hungarian fascist group Arrow Cross in 1944 and 1945. The sculpture recreates 60 pairs of 1940s styled shoes in bronze and I found these very personal reminders of those who died to be an effectively poignant reminder. Arrow Cross were not Nazis and were highly critical of Hitler, but their white supremacist ideology led to similar bigoted actions and outrages. I was saddened to realise that, only seventy years later, humanity is already forgetting and allowing such groups to become influential again.

Anna Kethly statue 
While in Vienna, Dave and I had commented on the vast number of statues depicting triumphant warmongering men. It's much the same in London and other cities and we wondered whether Western society would have evolved differently if more peaceful men or even (shock, horror) women had historically been given similar prominence. On that note I was pleased to spot this statue of Hungarian Socialist politician Anna Kethly. It was unveiled two years ago and is tucked away in Olimpia Park. Kethly was an incredible woman and I was happy to discover more about her life.

On a lighter note, we saved the most fun thing in Budapest for our last day there. I like a good fountain anyway, but the musical fountain on Margaret Island is fab! It is pretty impressive anyway but on the hour every day (during the summer months at least) it dances to music. Its repertoire ranges from classical to folk music to pop and rock. I loved how tightly the water jets are choreographed to the musical rhythms. One of the songs was Mungo Jerry's cheesy classic In The Summertime for which not only does the fountain fire on the beat, but the water landed on the beat too! Each show lasts about fifteen minutes and it's free! There are dozens of YouTube videos ...




Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Our citybreak in Budapest

Our third recent citybreak destination was Budapest in Hungary. We did discover that, not unexpectedly, exploring three cities back-to-back in twelve was A Bit Much so our energy levels flagged here!

Our Airbnb accommodation was a quirky studio flat owned by Bea and Bali. This was the easiest of our checkins as Bali was waiting in the street, waving, as we trudged up the hill with our rucksacks. The flat is well located for sightseeing and, had there not been builders working next door, would have been pretty peaceful too. It had everything we needed although cooking up meals could have been tricky because the kitchen wasn't particularly well equipped. Bali did bring us over a kettle though so we managed just fine. I loved the random vintage decor and sitting out on the roof decking in glorious sunshine. We got too lucky with the weather in Budapest - so hot we melted!

After only strolling down to the riverside to gaze over at the illuminated Parliament building on our first evening, we set out with a real sense of purpose for our first day. Just across the street from our apartment building was the start of a flight of steps leading up to Buda Castle and, I think, some of the oldest streets in Budapest. Some parts of this area are very touristy and others surprisingly empty and peaceful. I loved the white stone of the castle and churches against the blue sky, and the patterned tiled roofs one of which can be seen in this photo. We declined to climb a tall church tower near to here, but did admire an amazing bronze replica of a coronation cloak within its ruined walls. The original fabric cloak is in the national museum and, judging by the detail on its replica, the embroidery must be incredible.

Our highlight of the day was visiting a fascinating museum, The Hospital In The Rock, which is somewhere I think every Budapest visitor should tour. It costs about £11 a ticket, but is free for EU nationals aged 70 and over. Fortunately we got there pre-Brexit so Dave could take advantage of this! Originally a series of caves created by waterflow, the underground space was fitted out as a state of the art hospital for the Second World War and was repurposed as a Soviet nuclear bunker in the 1960s. Abandoned as a timecapsule for decades, it is now possible to join guided tours (in English or Magyar) of about a tenth of the facility. Some rooms atmospherically display the caves as a hospital, others contain bunker artefacts, one has a full-size helicopter, and there is also a harrowing Hiroshima exhibition - particularly timely as America and North Korea continue to trade potentially lethal insults. Unfortunately the museum forbids absolutely all photography, presumably because it would slow down the pace of tour groups, so I couldn't take any pics. Click through to the website to catch a glimpse inside.


Friday, 22 September 2017

#TreatYourself - special offers that caught my eye

Gingerbread Baking Kit at BakerLou 
September has nearly passed us by already and, with Halloween and Christmas both looming into view, my thoughts are on sweet treats with which to Treat Yourself this month!

If you spend as much time on Twitter as I do, you might have noticed that it is #cupcakeweek! Louise Ward at BakerLou is certainly celebrating it and is offering 20% off her cake and biscuit making kits for the duration. A perfect gift idea, these kits are a great way to get children baking or for people with busy lives who love the idea of baking but don't have time to search out ingredients and recipe. Ingredients come pre-weighed, individually bagged and presented in a gift box with tissue paper. There's a a wipe clean recipe card too! Use checkout code CUPCAKE to get your 20% discount.

Kitchen Accessories at Ethical Superstore 
I'm excited to see the New Autumn Kitchen Range at Ethical Superstore, especially as the retailer is offering £10 off orders over £70 plus free delivery as standard with orders over £50. The Kitchen Range includes fair trade and eco-friendly items for dining and entertaining, cooking and food prep, kitchen accessories and appliances, plus essential home composting. There's even a section of picnicware although I think we might not be doing much more picnicking this year! Use checkout code X10TMY to activate the discount.

The Glasgow Soap Company has a great multi-buy deal on its Cocktail Lip Balms - 4 for £10 - so I think I will stock up to get us through the winter. Boozy flavours include Mojito, Margarita, Prosecco Bellini and Strawberry Daquiri (and there are non-boozy choices too!). All the Lip Balms are made from high quality Coconut Oil, Shea Butter and Beeswax and have a natural SPF of 15. The natural oils and butters sink into the skin, helping to soothe, moisturise, hydrate and condition your lips. Plus they do not contain any artificial sweetener as this causes you to lick your lips which can worsen dry conditions.

There's still just time to take advantage of a pair of tea and coffee offers at Whittard Of Chelsea. Both require spends of £60 in order to get free rewards. You can get yourself a free Pao Mug and two packets of tea if you use the promotional code DISCOVER or a brew stick and two packs of coffee with the promotional code WILD. These offers expire at midnight on the 24th of September though so click through now!

Finally I want to show you these only-slightly-Christmassy tea cups and saucers at Emma Bridgewater. I love the little robin design which is subtle enough that they could be used all year round! A boxed Joy Angel Tea Cup and Saucer usually retails for £34.95 and they are currently reduced to just £20.95 - a saving of 40%. There aren't many sets left and this is a discontinued design so buy soon and stash them away!
Tea Cup and Saucer at Emma Bridgewater 

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Vienna: the Wiener Prater and the Hundertwasser House

Prior to visiting Vienna, a little of our research was watching the classic Orson Welles film of Graham Greene's The Third Man, filmed in the war damaged city in 1948. Of course there aren't piles of rubble everywhere now, but the iconic ferris wheel still stands in the Wiener Prater. This area of the city is now a large park - partly green space with sports facilities and walking/jogging trails and partly a funfair with dozens of terrifying-looking rides. Fortunately Dave and I think similarly about being flung upside-down dozens of feet up in the air so we stayed firmly on the ground while everyone else screamed above us!

I was a little disappointed by the lack of street art in Vienna. The city is built on a grand scale and has glorious avenues of impressive buildings, but mostly lacks the little streets and alleys where guerrilla artists hone their work. There are unexpected public sculptures though and I liked this army of bird boxes - Warten auf Vogel IV (Waiting for Birds IV) by Josef Bernhardt. It is part of an Art For All initiative which has artworks installed in odd locations. This one is on a wide street corner in an unassuming neighbourhood.


Most fun is an inventively decorated apartment block known as the Hundertwasser House after the artist who designed it, Friedensreich Hundertwasser. He worked with architects Josef Krawina and Peter Pelikan to create a wonderfully quirky structure. The Hundertwasser House is actually a residential building so visitors aren't allowed to go wandering around inside, but we loved being able to see the outside. Fab details include mosaiced pillars and an undulating cobbled street on which several selfie-taking tourists struggled to balance!



Tuesday, 19 September 2017

The glorious Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna

Another of our most memorable visits while in Vienna was our excursion to the Schoenbrunn Palace. This massive residence was once home to the ruling Habsburg dynasty and has to be seen to be believed! It is now a UNESCO world heritage site with much of the grounds and parkland open to the public for free, and part of the house viewable for a price. The two house tours are both accompanied by audioguides. The Imperial Tour takes visitors through 22 rooms and the Grand Tour takes in 40 rooms. We chose the Grand Tour and were glad to have done so because the most interesting room decor was in the later rooms after the two tours diverged! Photography within the house is forbidden so I can't show the sumptuous interiors here - although a quick Google will no doubt give you the idea!

Schoenbrunn Palace was originally built as a hunting lodge in the mid-1500s. Maria Theresa had it rebuilt and extended in the 1740s after she received the estate as a wedding gift and her family continued to occupy the Palace until the last Habsburg emperor was deposed in 1918. It has been a museum since the 1950s although only a few of the 1441 rooms can be seen. The audioguide is quite good albeit brief so we found there were artworks - tapestries especially - in some of the rooms about which no information was given and staff were few and far between. The overriding impression of the Palace for me was of a family spending more and more money to stave off depression. For all their power and wealth, I didn't hear of one actually having a happy life and many died young or were murdered.

The parkland was lovely to walk around and we enjoyed strolling the shaded avenues as we visited on a pretty hot day. Areas such as the Palm House (pictured) and its companion Desert House require additional payment to enter, but their architecture - the most impressive aspect for us - can be admired for free from outside! I also liked the brightly coloured floral displays immediately in front of the Palace. Their swirls and serpentine borders reflected the gilded ornamented ceilings we had seen in almost every room of our house tour.

Numerous sculptures are dotted throughout the park. Several are anonymous, but we learned that the Roman-style folly entitled The Ruin Of Carthage was designed by Johann Ferdinand Hetzendorf von Hohenberg and built in 1778. It features the river gods of the Danube and the Enns as sculpted by Wilhelm Beyer. There is absolutely nothing authentically Roman about the work. Even its ruined appearance is the result of Hetzendorf's design although recent renovation means it doesn't look quite as ruined now as it did a decade ago! Apparently the Habsburgs saw themselves as the natural successors to the earlier Roman conquerors so having The Ruin Of Carthage built in their garden was essentially propaganda.


Also a magnificent sight within the gardens is the Neptune Fountain - another Johann Ferdinand Hetzendorf von Hohenberg and Wilhelm Beyer collaboration. Commissioned by Empress Maria Theresa, it was intended to be the crowning glory of the gardens and I would say it fulfils that purpose! Started in 1776, the Fountain was completed just before Maria Theresa died.


Thursday, 14 September 2017

Exploring Vienna - trams and horses

Our three-city epic citybreak is so busy that my blogging about it is way behind schedule! I apologise for that! You can read my Prague posts here which was the first of the trio and from where we got a train to Vienna. Our Viennese Airbnb studio apartment was excellent so I am happy to recommend it. If you need accommodation for one or two people in Vienna, book into Christof's place! It had everything we needed, was conveniently located and was pretty peaceful too. If it had been available in 1899, I am sure Mark Twain would have loved it! (I spotted this plaque on the building where he did stay in Vienna, but forgot to note down the address and now can't remember! The sojourn might have formed part of his A Tramp Abroad research (my book review here)

We started with a circuit on the Ring Tram which was a great way to learn about the historic buildings lining the Ringstrasse. The half-hour tram ride is €9 and this includes an audioguide in various languages for which headphones are provided. We got a good view of everything from the distinctive yellow tram and taking the journey helped with getting our bearings when later exploring on foot. The only downside was the Mozart-interspersed narration meant I kept humming the Marriage Of Figaro overture for the rest of the day!

We were sadly underwhelmed with the Museums Quarter although the cafe there has an amazing tiled ceiling, but did find other artwork around the city including this Rachel Whiteread sculpture outside the Jewish Museum. Having first encountered her work only three months ago at Houghton Hall I easily recognised it again in and this Viennese Library is a particularly powerful piece as every book on its shelves represents a Jewish lifestory that was cut short by the Holocaust. 65,000 Viennese Jews were murdered by the Nazis.

More sculpture was on show at the Theseus Temple in the Volkspark. This replica of an Athenian temple was originally constructed in the 1820s to house a statue of Theseus slaying the Minotaur. That work was moved to the city art museum and now the space is used to display a single large sculpture each year. For 2017 the work is Bacchante by American artist Kathleen Ryan. The polished concrete grapes did fit with the ancient Greek theme of the setting but it did look a bit lost under the high ceiling!


My high spot of visiting Vienna was seeing the magnificent Lipizzaner stallions of the Spanish Riding School. I had a book about this School in my younger pony-mad days so it was the culmination of a childhood dream to actually get there! We didn't see the full show, but it is possible to buy tickets for the Morning Training which is two hours of groups of horses being put through their paces and practising some of the high dressage for which they are famous. Photography is absolutely 'verboten' and my camera probably wouldn't have been up to the task anyway so I have found a YouTube showing the horses and their beautiful riding school. All the riders in the video are male, but women have joined their ranks since 2008 and several of the riders we saw training were female. All the horses are still male though!



Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Top Five Etsy Finds - Fabulous Capes

Angelica Cape by beksiesboutique 
I started September by reading C H Clepitt's new novel, Everything Is Better With A Cape (my book review here). It's a fun post-apocalyptic fantasy tale and the title got me thinking. Is everything really better with a cape? If so, should I get myself one? With autumn underway and Halloween on the horizon, now would certainly be the time to do so!

There are far more handmade and vintage capes on Etsy than I actually expected to see and, for sensible purchases, there are sturdy outdoor capes in tweed and wools, or delicate shrug capes for wedding wear. I wanted something more eyecatching for this post though so here are five of the most Fabulous capes I found!

The Angelica Cape made by beksiesboutique in Brighton might only be short, but it packs a lot of sparkle! Turquoise suedette is teamed with beautiful iridescent sequins sent from unicorn heaven to shower down upon the shoulders of mere mortals. The cape is lined with purple and ice blue shot 100% silk Dupion, resulting in a shimmering luxury piece.

The Angelica Cape is for sale at £150 plus shipping.


Woodland Fairy Cape by folkowl 
Angela Shannon at folkowl in Whitstable is the creator of this green felted Woodland Fairy Cape. Made from hand dyed wools and silks in shades of dark green and mossy green, these capes are made to order, the process involved and the individual details ensuring that each one is unique. The cape fastens with a corset-style closure across the front so is adaptable for most sizes. I think it would be a gorgeous addition to a fantasy cosplay outfit as well as being ideal winter outerwear in its own right.

The Woodland Fairy Cape is for sale at £125 plus shipping.


Reversible Rainbow Cape
by MadWagCostume
 
This vivid Reversible Rainbow Cape is 'made with madness' at the MadWagCostume studio in Bristol. One side is the rainbow print as pictured or the cape can be worn inside-out with the rainbows inside and a vibrant scarlet (as can just be seen in the hood) on show to the world. This is a real extroverts' cape! To complete the full dizzying look, matching crop tops and leggings (or meggings for men) are also available. For maximum comfort these capes have been designed with 2 ties to support the weight of the cape across the chest and not the neck. All capes are made with the highest quality of spandex and have 2 finger loops to enable hands free flying.

The Reversible Rainbow Cape is for sale at £94.99 plus shipping.


Sari Cape by
IamtheGarageFlowerGB
 
Hannah in Leicester creates her eyecatching capes from vintage saris and other sourced materials. Her Etsy shop is called IamtheGarageFlowerGB and she is inspired by 1960s and 70s bohemian and psychedelic style. Of the capes Hannah had available at the time of writing I think this orange and purple toned Sari Cape is my favourite. I love the detailed print on the fabric. Each cape is free sized so it should fit anyone from a size 8 to a size 16.

The Sari Cape is for sale at £42 plus shipping.


This fifth cape was actually the first one that caught my eye, but I wanted to save what I think is the most fabulous for last! It's a Holographic Sequin Cape made by koolieskreations in London and I can see it being absolutely perfect for wannabe mermaids. The material shown is a holographic sequin mesh in blue-green tones and the cape can also be made in ice white, silver, gold or black. As each is made to order, customers can also request a hood and that their cape be lined if they want.

The Holographic Sequin Cape is for sale from £60 plus shipping.
Holographic Sequin Cape
by koolieskreations